Swedish retail company, H&M, suggests raising prices to benefit factory workers

Considering seven whole months have passed by since the tragic Bangladesh factory collapse in April, I find it pretty disappointing that now that only just recently has a public statement been made by H&M, a major fashion vendor, “expecting” to increase prices of their products in order to increase the livable wages of the employed factory workers – meaning that they’re not even sure if they’re going to do this.  It merely seems that they are toying with the idea of this, and thus the dependent factory workers’ futures.

More disappointing is the fact that many companies are only meddling with the ideas of human rights, fair wages, and other buzz words such as “sustainability” simply because a tragic event put the issue on the table and made everyone aware.  Because, you know, it wasn’t really the norm to pay people livable wages and to not trash the environment in your capitalistic pursuits until hundreds of people die, making some people feel bad about where the cloth on their back comes from.  It seems almost trendy now, to be a fair, “good” company that pays respect to social and environmental responsibility.

While I am slightly impressed that H&M has even considered the option of raising prices to allow their factory workers a more decent wage, I have doubts that the quality of their clothing will improve very much.  I predict that the clothing will become slightly more expensive rags that will continue to look cheap and fall apart within a season, or even last one whole season, causing you to spend more money in the long run… that is, if you decide to shop at H&M.

If you’re interested in reading more about the Bandladesh factory incident or learning more about the H&M thoughts on fair living wages, check out these articles:

What are your thoughts on the matter?

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simple with layers

simple with layers
Styling a Zara two-sided plaid scarf and black cardigan I recently ordered with items similar to those in my own closet. (Well, I don’t have the Frye Veronica Combat boots… yet)

The Zara scarf is $35.50. I considered sewing my own, but when hunting for similar fabrics, I could not find a plaid pattern I approved of, although it was easy to find the herringbone print within the first minute of my search.  Upon realizing I would only save a mere ten bucks, I decided to suck it up and order the scarf.

While I try to avoid buying new these days, I felt better after reading Zara’s mission statement:

“AT THE STORE

We save energy. The eco-friendly store.
We are implementing an eco-friendly management model in our shops in order to reduce energy consumption by 20%, introducing sustainability and efficiency criteria. This management model sets out measures to be applied to all processes, including the design of the shop itself, the lighting, heating and cooling systems and the possibility of recycling furniture and decoration.

We produce less waste and recycle. Recycling hangers and alarms, which are picked up from our shops and processed into other plastic elements, is an example of our waste management policy. Millions of hangers and alarms are processed each year and both the cardboard and plastic used for packaging are also recycled.”

I love it when a retailer conscientiously places value on the environment and tries to minimize waste accordingly.

Owl Plushie: NAILED IT.

I created something that reminded me of a meme.

Expectation:

Image

Reality:

Image

Here’s what I’d do differently next time:

  • Use felt for the beak and maybe the eyes, as well as for accent pieces of the owl.
  • Cut out a bigger pattern!  I forgot about seam allowances (I haven’t sewed in a while, okay?!) so it ended up becoming smaller than I intended. Oops.
  • Make sure to sew the individual pieces of a “side” first before trying to sew the front and back pieces together!  That’s why there’s a fuzzy situation going on, on the right of the owl.
  • Add wings! I initially cut out wings, but then I forgot to add them.  Oops No. 2!

I used some scrap fabric I found at the reuse store and tiny bits of my “good” fabric as well as buttons I already had laying around, and I got some practice in, so it was definitely a learning experience!

Here’s my cat pretending to cuddle it for the photo.

uma_owl_circles

She later kicked it away while taking a nap.

Credit:  The green owl is found here by the Manic Muffin Totes Etsy shop.

What I’d like to sew

What I'd like to sew

A flouncy floral skirt with plenty of soft pleats and a little black dress with a chiffon layer… because, you know, you can never have too many little black dresses.

Finding inspiration for sewing things is easy… finding things for sewing what you want is hard.

Image credit:  Left – Hapa Time; Right – Unknown Pinterest source.

Thrift Score: Burnt orange tweed jacket.

Thrift Score:  Burnt orange tweed jacket.

While scavenging a thrift/re-use shop for materials I could use for Christmas packing, I discovered this gem of a jacket. It was less than 10 bucks. It’s a size medium, so it’s a tad loose on me, but I like the way it looks.

When it comes to thrift shopping, or shopping in general, you’ve got to disregard size labels and just go with what looks good on you and suits your style comfort level!