simple with layers

simple with layers
Styling a Zara two-sided plaid scarf and black cardigan I recently ordered with items similar to those in my own closet. (Well, I don’t have the Frye Veronica Combat boots… yet)

The Zara scarf is $35.50. I considered sewing my own, but when hunting for similar fabrics, I could not find a plaid pattern I approved of, although it was easy to find the herringbone print within the first minute of my search.  Upon realizing I would only save a mere ten bucks, I decided to suck it up and order the scarf.

While I try to avoid buying new these days, I felt better after reading Zara’s mission statement:

“AT THE STORE

We save energy. The eco-friendly store.
We are implementing an eco-friendly management model in our shops in order to reduce energy consumption by 20%, introducing sustainability and efficiency criteria. This management model sets out measures to be applied to all processes, including the design of the shop itself, the lighting, heating and cooling systems and the possibility of recycling furniture and decoration.

We produce less waste and recycle. Recycling hangers and alarms, which are picked up from our shops and processed into other plastic elements, is an example of our waste management policy. Millions of hangers and alarms are processed each year and both the cardboard and plastic used for packaging are also recycled.”

I love it when a retailer conscientiously places value on the environment and tries to minimize waste accordingly.

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“Conscious consumerism” is still consumerism.

One of the reasons why I started this blog was because I decided I wanted to commit to a lifestyle change for the better – not just for myself, but also for the wellbeing of the environment and the people with whom I share this world.  When I was about five years younger, I explored the realm of sustainably-created, environmentally-friendly goods, but I quickly forgot about this as I became more and more absorbed with the materialistic culture that society has cultivated over decades.  It almost seemed ingrained in my brain – and everyone else’s mind in my generation – that we should spend money and accumulate goods.  With the vast majority of companies opting to take their production of goods overseas, where they typically pay people lower wages, we as a society are becoming quite comfortable with our consumerism habits.  It’s even easier now to experience instant gratification when you’ve got online vendors at your fingertips, with overnight or two-day shipping options available so that you can have what you want as quickly as possible.  Or, you can make it even more instant by personally visiting one of the billions of brick-and-mortar stores that offer a selection of cheaply made goods that you can pick up and take home.

This summer, I moved into a studio.  My boyfriend, who was helping me, commented, “You sure have a lot of stuff for one person!”  It was absolutely true.  Some things, I felt were necessary, such as the sofa, chairs, bed, and lamps, but I felt like the bulk of it was comprised of my closet.  Over the years, I’d dig into my closet every now and then and sort out all the things I no longer wanted or things that I haven’t worn in a long time.  I would make a huge pile, stuff them into one or two (or even three) large bags, and I would donate them.  Then, more recently, I remarked to my boyfriend, after opening my walk-in closet door and revealing the unorganized mess inside, “I can’t seem to make a dent in this closet!  Every time I donate something, I always seem to have the same amount of clothes!”  He said something that was very obvious and made a lot of sense, “You do make a dent.  But you also buy things to replace what you got rid of, so it seems like you didn’t.”  I realized then that I needed to make strict changes with my consuming habits.  Even though I believed I was being more of a conscious consumer because I was choosing to buy goods that were secondhand, vintage, produced by independent sellers, or produced by companies that touted fair trade/fair wages/sustainable/ethical/etc., I was still consuming and accumulating too much.

The bottom line:  Consumerism is consumerism.  Don’t buy too much.  If you’re going to buy something, consider where it came from, who made it, and how long it’s going to last you.